Transcript

Introduction

Zen and the Art of Mobile Development

 

[music]

 

>> Dave:  Welcome, everybody. My name is Dave Anderson and I’ll be moderating today’s webinar: Zen and the Art of Mobile Development. Dan McGhan, our Oracle ACE will be presenting. 

 

[pause]

 

And for those students returning, you know to ask your questions in the chat window, and as often and as frequently as possible, I’ll feed them over to him and Dan will respond with the answers, if possible. For the first timers here, don’t forget to keep your chat windows open. Your question and answers will be in there. You’ll also find some good information buzzing by as you watch and listen to Dan talk about mobile development. 

 

[pause]

 

As usual, we’ll attempt to record this, this session and it will become a tutorial on our website. So, you can go to SkillBuilders.com/APEX and you can see a list of all of the free tutorials. We’ve got up there hours and hours and hours of good, good training – free training that’s available to you. 

 

[pause]

 

Dan, again, our APEX author, developer, and general APEX advocate is here to teach us today. And with that, I’ll pass it right over to Dan. Welcome, Dan.

 

[pause]

 

>> Dan:  Thank you, Dave. And welcome, everybody. Thanks for joining us today. 

 

[pause]

 

So, this is me. It was me. About a year – a year and a half ago I had just left a conference, this Kscope, and in the conference I saw the APEX development team creating mobile web applications that looked just like native applications people were creating in say the iPads and in the mobile phones of today, and I was pretty blown away by this. I left the conference, really excited to give it a try. 

 

[pause]

 

Then the next day, I found that creating these mobile applications wasn’t as easy as I thought it would be. 

 

[pause]

 

Over the years, I had attained a bit of knowledge about building desktop web applications and it didn’t really transfer over as well as I thought it would to a mobile world. 

 

[pause]

 

So, I went back to school. I bought a lot of books and I got to study. You’ll see a few of those books here – some of the more important ones. And out of these, perhaps the most important is the book on Steve Jobs, his biography. 

 

[pause]

 

Steve changed the world of mobile development – both on the hardware side as well as the software side. What we saw him bring to the world was a lot simpler than what we had seen before. The reason for this is that Steve was very Zen. It was a big part of his lifestyle. 

 

[pause]

 

In the world of Zen, you’ll encounter words like this: “less is more” and when you read them you’ll feel at peace. Mmm. Oh, sorry. Where were we? Right. Less is more. 

 

[pause]

 

Here’s the thing about these words. They can be a little deceiving especially in the world of mobile development. If you think for example that because you’re creating a mobile app, it’s going to be smaller, so it probably has fewer pages, maybe less content, fewer columns, less items, that it will be easier – you’re wrong. 

 

[pause]

 

In the mobile world, less is more effort because every pixel matters. You’re going to have to put more thought into what you put in a screen. Does that content need to be there? Does that column or item need to be in the page? If not, you need to eliminate it. And that’s why you have to put more effort into your mobile web apps. 

 

[pause]

 

My advice, just keep this in mind when you’re starting in mobile development and you won’t be as disappointed as I found myself on my first day. 

 

[pause]

 

So, what are we up to today? Well, I’m going to create a mobile web app. We’re going to do this in APEX 4.2, which was the release that brought this really the forefront, made it real easy to do in APEX. 

 

[pause]

 

Along the way, we’re going to take a look at some common mobile design patterns and of course we’ll then implement those patterns into our application. 

 

[pause]

 

“What is a pattern?” you may be asking. Well, in essence it’s just a proven solution to a common problem. If you think, for example, that you’re the first person creating the login screen to a mobile application, again, you’d be wrong. People have done this, they’ve experimented, and they’ve learned and oftentimes it’s easier to learn from what others have done. There’s no real need to always reinvent the wheel. 

 

[pause]

 

In addition, these patterns can serve as inspiration. What’s the best way to display that piece of information? Well, you might want to study up on lists and tables in the mobile world. 

 

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At this point you’re may be thinking, “Wait. These patterns sound cool. Where do I find them?” 

 

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There’s a book for that. This is one of the books I’ve read. This is the “Mobile Design Pattern Gallery” by Theresa Neil. On the right, you can see the various chapters within the book and the number of patterns and these chapters are really important. It covers all kinds of things from navigation to tables and lists and search and feedback, really important information in here that can serve as inspiration. 

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Transcript

Demonstration: Create the Mobile Application

Zen and the Art of Mobile Development: Create the Mobile App

 

[music]

 

>> Dan:  What I’m going to do right now is create a mobile application, but I want to show you a couple of things first. I’m in my workspace here and in every workspace when they’re created by default (almost always in life) there’s a sample database application that gets installed to the workspace. 

 

[pause]

 

When you run it, this is what it looks like. This application – hopefully everybody is familiar with this one. It’s been around for quite some time now and with each new release of APEX, it’s usually enhanced a bit to include and demonstrate some of the features within the product so you can always learn from this app. 

 

[pause]

 

It’s a simple app used to maintain data like customer information as we see here. We can drill down and maintain a customer. We also see products. Note that we can actually see the product before we drill down into it to maintain it. 

 

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In addition, one of the things that they’ve added in the most recent release was this ability to search. For example, if I want to search for – let’s see if I can find a customer in here like Logan. 

 

[pause]

 

I type in “Logan” and we land on a search results page and we have a couple of links we could use. So it works about as we would expect it to. 

 

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Now, what we’re going to do today is create basically the mobile version of this application. We’re going to ignore the fact that there’s this link begging to be clicked for mobile and we’re going to create it from scratch right now. So, let me get started. 

 

[pause]

 

I seem to have been logged out of my workspace. Let me get logged back in here. 

 

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Okay, first thing, I have this placeholder here. That will become more obvious in a second. The first thing I need to do is just to leave this placeholder application. We’ll get rid of that and now we can go ahead and create our app. I hit the create button. 

 

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This will be a database application, but I need to use this specific app ID. The name of the application I’m creating will be “sample database application” but of course we’re creating the mobile version. Now this part’s important, down here, “user interface.” We need to change it from desktop to jQuery Mobile Smartphone. 

 

[pause]

 

I hit “Create,” “Confirm.” 

 

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And we’re done. We now have a mobile application. I’d like to thank everybody for coming. Have a great day. 

 

[pause]

 

Just kidding. We actually just have a show, right? We still have a lot of work to do. 

 

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What I want to do first – hopefully this will work. 

 

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I’d like everybody here today that has either a tablet or smartphone to go to this URL, bit.ly/apexmobiledemo. It’s a little long, sorry about that. Apexmobiledemo. If you’re here and you don’t have a tablet or a smartphone, you’re probably in the wrong webinar. But honestly, if you don’t, that’s all right. You can follow along with what I’m doing on screen but I think it will be more interesting and more fun if you go ahead and pull this up. I’m going to wait just a moment while folks put this up. I see that there’s Scott and [03:49 inaudible] in the chat, so it looks like I can go ahead and move on. I appreciate that, Dave. 

 

[pause]

 

All right, we’re here on our first pattern. This is the sign-in pattern. A couple of notes on this particular pattern. The first three are going to one thing in general, which is to keep it simple. This is a screen that your users are going to encounter in almost any app that they access and you want to make this page as simple as possible. Don’t keep them out of the app, let them get into the app. Don’t innovate here. Also provide some help in case they need it. That’s the general idea. 

 

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What kind of page did we get for login? What I’m going to do is run my app. I’m going to right-click here, open it up in another tab. I’m going to pull this tab out and then I’m going to resize it. 

 

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This is close to what I need and that should be about right. 

 

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Here’s our login page. Not exactly what I would consider great, but unless we have something to compare it to we might actually think that this is good enough. 

 

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What kind of patterns are there out there? Here are a couple from the book. Really good examples, by the way. This look sharp and I’ll tell you, to do this it takes some effort. 

 

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They’re rather common. We have some username and password fields, nice and big, take up the full width of the screen. Nice big login buttons, you can’t miss those. Down here we see options to sign-up if you don’t already have an account. And then of course the help we talked about in case you need it. 

 

[pause]

 

Another pattern is to put a screen in front of the login screen, to let the user specify whether or not they have an account and go from there, sort of a fork in the road instead. Both of these are common, the users know how to use them both, so you can make use of them. What a lot of these examples do in addition, they also show us what application it is that we’re logging into. That’s important. 

 

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Transcript

Demonstration: Search Patterns

Zen and the Art of Mobile Development: Search Patterns

 

[music]

 

>> Dan:  Before we continue with the navigation patterns, I think this is a good time to talk about search patterns. Obviously, search is really big these days. Google is doing it, sure. But so are a lot of people inside their own applications. I showed you just a moment ago that in the demo app, they’ve actually added the search capability. 

 

[pause]

 

There are patterns for search as you might have assumed. On the left here we have explicit search. This is the most common type of search. You just put in what you’re looking for, you hit “Go” and it takes you to a page with the search results, and hopefully find what you were after. 

 

[pause]

 

On the right is something a lot more complex. Obviously, this was created out of necessity, to make it easy for people to find certain flights, they had to create a search form that worked well in mobile. And I can tell you just by looking at this that it took a lot of effort to create this particular page. But as you can see, it’s very useful and easy to work with, so cost-benefit. 

 

[pause]

 

Here’s some more. We have auto-complete on the left. And TripAdvisor is doing something neat here. They’re actually grouping the auto-complete results into two different groups, which is something I had not seen before. 

 

[pause]

 

Obviously, this works – as you start to type, you almost look ahead on the bottom. 

 

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Here we have dynamic search. This is the type of search that you have in your mobile phone when you go to your contacts and you have this giant list of contacts, and then you start to search. Each letter that you type in reduces the list to match the search. That’s dynamic search and it worked well as long as you don’t have too much to start with, too many items. 

 

[pause]

 

Finally, we have scope search over here. If you’re as big as Google and/or you just want to allow customers or users to search specific parts of you app then you can add the ability to select or set the scope before doing the search. 

[pause]

 

That’s nice. What about adding search to our application? Let’s do it. 

 

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What I did for this, I actually went in and I stole some of the code from the sample application because it already had search implemented, I went and I saw how they did it and that brought me to this PL/SQL. I’ll show you that in the moment. Here it is. 

 

[pause]

 

What they were doing is declaring a variable – a set of them – and then executing some codes. And perhaps the most important part of this is this portion right here. 

 

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What they’re basically doing is creating a custom region page here and they’re using sys.htp.p to dynamically put together some html content, a really neat technique in capability in APEX. It allows you to do pretty much anything you might need to do. Htp.p works a lot like DBMS output.put line in that it adds content to a buffer. Only this particular buffer is read by the listener, used by APEX so we can generate dynamic content. 

 

[pause]

 

So that’s how they did it. I just modified their code a little bit to work better in the mobile world. 

 

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We want to add search. The first thing I need to do is create a new item for this. So “Create a new item.” Of course, it’ll be a simple text field and we’ll call it P1_SEARCH. 

 

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I’m not going to use a label for this, even though it might be a good idea to. I want to show you a better tool we have now in APEX 4.2. I do want to submit when “Enter” is pressed. I’ll set that to “Yes” and we’ll create this item. 

 

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First, I’m going to move the item so that it’s at the top of the springboard and I’ll drill in. I’m going to show you something neat. You’ll find this inside the element attributes. You see this value placeholder. I can say, “Search here,” and you’ll see that when we run the page it’ll be in the element and when the user starts to use it will clear itself out. 

 

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We can take a look at our new search ability. 

 

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There it is. And as soon as I start to type, you’ll see the search go away. 

 

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All right, it works good. What I don’t like about it is the styling. Again, on the left, it’s not centered, cutting off some of the highlighting and so on. 

 

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What I have here is some modified CSS to improve upon. Of course, now I’m targeting search and just improving a few things here. So, I’ll copy this. 

 

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And I’m going to go back into the CSS for the page. 

 

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I’ll update what we have. 

 

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Apply the change, we come back to our example. That looks better and you can see it will adjust like we need it to. Perfect. 

 

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Now what we need is a search results page. So, I’ll go ahead and create a new page. 

 

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This is going to be another blank page, but it will be page 6. 

 

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We’ll call it “search results.” 

 

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Now I can edit this page and go onto this really basic html region that it had created for me and change the type from standard html text to PL/SQL anonymous block, which allows me to then have all of these PL/SQL here which is generating our search results. 

 

[pause]

 

Copy that, paste it in, apply the changes and we’re almost ready. The only thing I need now is to return to page 1 and create a means to go from this page when we’re searching over to page 6. So for that, I’m going to create a branch. That item is the only way to submit the page so I’ll go ahead and just make it unconditional. 

 

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Another neat thing in 4.2 is we can name our branches, so I can call this one “go to search results” and of course it’s taken us to a page in the app and that page is 6. So, create that branch. 

 

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Now when we run our demo, I’ll type in a search – we searched for “Logan” before, I’ll try it again. 

 

[pause]

 

There we go. Now we can find Logan. 

 

[pause]

 

So, search is not terribly hard to add to even a mobile application.

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Transcript

Demonstration: List Menu Basics

Zen and the Art of Mobile Development: List Menu Basics

 

[music]

 

>> Dan:  Right now, you’re probably getting all kinds of errors if you’re trying to load these pages that don’t yet exist, so let’s fix that. Let’s add some new pages. And to do this we’ll explore what are called list menus in the mobile world. These are sort of the reports that we’re used to in the desktop world. They’re called list menus in the mobile world. 

 

[pause]

 

Now, some basics. Like a springboard, the list menu can serve as jump into hot points. So, it’s not uncommon to find these on the home page of an application. Also, like the springboard, they’re always neutral. So it doesn’t matter. The operating systems, the concepts are rather similar in all of them. 

 

[pause]

 

What’s neat about the list menu, however, is that we have some formatting options. We can use longer text. Here we see darker, larger text. Under that some smaller, longer text and even icons in such as well. So, lots of options with these. 

 

[pause]

 

Here we have a few variations. On the left we see grouped, which is just when we take more than one list menu, place it on the same page, and of course the options within each should be related. 

 

[pause]

 

There’s a personalized list menu, and in this case the options that one sees when they’re logged in are custom to them. So if I login, I’ll see my classes. If you login, you’d see your classes. 

 

[pause]

 

Then we have enhanced. What Amazon has done here is they started with a really simple list menu and then got really complex here. This list menu, in addition formatting, has the ability to buy and also play which is really complex. So you can take these to really great lengths if needed. 

 

[pause]

 

Let’s add some list menus to our app and we’ll see exactly how easy it can be. 

 

[pause]

 

For this, I’m going to create some new pages. I’m going to select the form option because I actually want both a form and a list view combined. 

 

[pause]

 

So I’m going to create page 2 now and page 2 the page name will be CUSTOMERS. 

 

[pause]

 

This will be on top of the DEMO_CUSTOMERS table.

 

[pause]

 

And for the display column, we have to choose from the list here but we’re going to modify this later. For now, I’m just going to display the last name. 

 

[pause]

 

For the form page, I’ll make this page 3. We’ll call it CUSTOMER DETAILS. 

 

[pause]

 

For the primary key, I am going to use the primary key column because this is how I have on the link setup so far. 

 

[pause]

 

We do have an existing trigger to maintain the value of the primary key column. And for the form, I’ll just go ahead and throw all the items in for customers. 

 

[pause]

 

We’ll allow all DML operations and complete the wizard. 

 

[pause]

 

All right, let’s see what we got. So I’ll return to the home page, go to customers. Excellent. This is our list menu, really basic for now. Let’s see if we can make it a bit more attractive, a bit more useful. I’m going to return to our page, this is the list view region in page 2. 

 

[pause]

The first part looks like a standard report region. We have our query here, but when we move over to region attributes, things look very different than the standard report region. 

 

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There’s an option here for advanced formatting. I’m going to check that which exposes text formatting here. I have a really simple example of how this could be used here. All I have is a basic html header, which of course makes larger text followed by a paragraph which would make smaller text. You can see that I can include the columns or aliases from my query to make this formatting even work. 

 

[pause]

 

Something else I want to show you is the search type here. Right now it’s doing server based search. If I move it to client side search, what do we have? Explicit search. Neat. So we’ll leave that, apply the change, return to the demo, refresh. So now we see some basic formatting in our search and we can drill in and see the form and so on, make any changes. Excellent. 

 

[pause]

 

Let’s finish by making the last two pages we need for products. 

 

[pause]

 

Again, it will be a form page. We’re going to use the form on a table with list view. I’m creating page 4 for product.

 

[pause]

 

And this will be on DEMO_PRODUCT_INFO. I have to select this. We’ll do the PRODUCT_NAME to start and we’ll change it up after. 

 

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The details page is going to be page 5.

 

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Again, I need to use PRODUCT_ID because of the links I’ve made already. We do have a trigger. 

 

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For the columns, I’m going to move them all over but then I’m going to move back columns that are related to the image because it’s really not a good thing to do on the mobile apps right now. 

[pause]

 

So, we continue. We will allow DML operations and we’ll create those pages. 

 

[pause]

 

Excellent. 

 

[pause]

 

So if I go back to my demo, go to home, go to products, we see like we saw them before, a very basic list view. Now, in the actual application that we’re creating the mobile version for, when we are here we can actually see the product, the image of the product. 

 

[pause]

 

Let’s see if we can do the same here. I’m going to edit this page and we’ll go into our product region, move over to the region attributes, and like before we’re going to do some advanced formatting. But believe it or not, it’s simpler than the previous option. 

 

[pause]

 

So, we’ll paste that in and we’re just showing the product name and the category. There’s another option here for “Show image” and when you check that, some other attributes are displayed. So, we can display an image. Now you could, for example, display one in a BLOB or you could reference URL. We’re going to leave it on the BLOB since we do have the image in the database. I just need to change the primary key column to PRODUCT_ID. 

 

[pause]

 

Like before, I’m going to change the search to client side, so we get our explicit search. We’ll apply those changes and return to the demo and see what we get. 

 

[pause]

 

Nice. It’s really easy provided that you have the column available. Excellent.

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Transcript

Demonstration: Tab Basics

Zen and the Art of Mobile Development: Tab Basics

 

[music]

 

>> Dan:  Let’s talk about tabs. This is the last navigational component we’re going to cover. Unlike the previous two, the springboard and the list menu, guess what? These are not OS neutral. Let’s see what I mean here in a moment. 

 

[pause]

 

You have to decide where you want to put your tabs – the top or the bottom. For me, I prefer them at the bottom because that’s where my thumb is, you see when I’m holding my cellphone. 

 

[pause]

 

Another note, you can actually make this scrollable. Not immediately obvious to most users when this happens, but it’s fairly common in the mobile world and we’re seeing it more and more. We just need to figure out a good way to make it really obvious and make that consistent. 

 

[pause]

 

But here’s what I mean by these are not OS neutral. Apple’s telling developers, “Hey, put your tabs along the bottom.” In Blackberry, they don’t know what they’re doing so they just copy Apple, put them at the bottom. But Android says, “No, no, no. Put them at the top.” At the top this is actually a bit more common when compared to what we’re used to in the desktop world, so it may be easier for users to transition to, but again this is maybe easier to reach with your thumb. So, you will have to decide where you want to put them. And because we don’t target a particular OS, you can put them wherever you want, it’ll be fine. 

 

[pause]

 

Let’s add some tabs. 

 

[pause]

 

For this, I actually need to go to that global page, page 0. 

 

[pause]

 

Down here we see that there’s actually a footer region. What I’m going to do, I’m going to add a sub-region inside the footer which will be the tabs. But I’m going to do this using a list which we’ve not yet created. So, we’ll go to our shared components.

 

[pause]

 

We’ll create a list. 

 

[pause]

 

We’ll call this very simply, TABS. It’s a static list and we need three entries, just like our springboard we need one home – that will take you to page 1. Another for customers – that will take you to page 2. And finally, products – those are found on page 4. 

 

[pause]

 

So, create this list. We’ll return to page 0 and now I can right-click here and I can create a sub-region. We’ll see our list option. 

 

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I’m going to call this TABS. 

 

[pause]

 

Now, what’s important is the template that I select. We’re actually going to select two while creating this particular region. The first template is the region template and I need one of these footer options. I’m going to use footer toolbar full screen. 

 

[pause]

 

Here we have the list and of course we only have one, it’s the tabs list. But again, I have a template to select and for this I’m going to use navigation bar. 

 

[pause]

 

We’ll create this list region and when we return to the demo, let’s say we go to the home page, we now see some tabs along the bottom. But it would be nice if we could add some icons above them. 

 

[pause]

 

What if found in the new template and there was a question that came in earlier regarding templates. Let me show you a list template. 

 

[pause]

 

This is the navigation bar, this template. 

 

[pause]

 

There’s this data icon which refers to the image portion of your list entries. So if we go into the list entries for tabs, drill in to say home, and here the image you can put for example “home,” apply that change, refresh your app. 

 

[pause]

 

And you see the home icon. Now it’s neat to know about all the different icons you have, you have to explore the jQuery documentation, the jQuery mobile documentation. So here the icon sets, we have the left arrow, the right arrow and so on. Here’s the home you just saw me use. You just find the one you want, take this text, and put it in the image area. 

 

[pause]

 

But what if I want to use custom images? Well, that’s supported too. You’ll see how to do that down here. 

 

[pause]

 

I’ve just taken some of the concepts from there and cooked up some CSS to do exactly that. I’m going to copy this and hopefully this will work. 

 

[pause]

 

I’m going to return to page 0. I need to put some CSS on every page. Guess what you can’t do on the global page. I’m going to be a little sneaky here, I’m going to go into the tabs region and I’m going to drop this CSS inside the region header. 

 

[pause]

 

Now it’s starting with an element selected by ID for the footer tabs, so I need to drop this inside the static ID of my region. The question was, are these workspace images? In fact, they are. Again, I’m using Glyphish icons. You can find those in a Google search. I bought them, they’re cheap, and I like the look and feel a lot better than what’s available by default in jQuery mobile. 

 

[pause]

 

>> Dave:  There was a question I thought was great. If you wanted to build the desktop and a mobile app, would you have time for two versions of each page?

 

>> Dan:  No. Actually, you don’t. This is something that changed quite dramatically in APEX 4.2. 

 

[pause]

 

When you look at an app, there’s a new column here, user interface and this particular app is using two, desktop and jQuery mobile smartphone, whereas these are using only one. So it’s possible now in a single application to have multiple user interfaces and thus multiple themes within a single application. 

 

[pause]

 

Also recently announced in the APEX 5.0 release, the plan is to include another user interface for tablets in the next release.

 

>> Dave:  Cool. Let’s sneak in one more here, Dan. Is it possible to implement images by URL, not as a BLOB?

 

>> Dan:  Absolutely. 

 

[pause]

 

We’ll look at page 4, go into the attributes for the list view, and right here you’ll see that option. You can use an image stored as BLOB or you can read from a URL. 

 

[pause]

 

Yup. It exists. 

 

[pause]

 

Any other questions?

 

[pause]

 

>> Dave:  There’s actually a few. Can I have more than two user interfaces and how do I add them?

 

>> Dan:  If I return to one of the applications that currently only has one – maybe this bug tracking app only has a desktop UI. You can go to edit application properties. You’ll find your user interface at the top here. 

 

[pause]

 

And toward the bottom you’ll see the ability to add a new user interface. So if you wanted to add the jQuery mobile smartphone here, you could do that or if you have a jQuery mobile smartphone, you want to add the desktop, you could do that as well. 

 

[pause]

 

As I said before, we’ll probably be seeing a third option for tablets in the next release of APEX.

 

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Transcript

Mobile Application Development Next Steps

Zen and the Art of Mobile Development: Next Steps

 

[music]

 

>> Dan:  I just want to show some next steps for everybody. First, I recommend you get inspired. Go to https://mobiledesignpatterngallery.com, it’s the website for the book. None of the text is in it but a lot of the screenshots are, so that’s sufficient for you to serve as inspiration. You can go there and check those images out. 

 

[pause]

 

After that, you might want to gain some knowledge. You don’t want to do what I did and disappoint yourself. Arm yourself with some knowledge. You can start by maybe going to https://jquerymobile.com. 

 

[pause]

 

Then you just need to get out and go play and perhaps the easiest way to get started with that, https://apex.oracle.com. It’s a free hosted instance of APEX. It only takes a few minutes to have a workspace up and running and you could get started making some mobile applications. 

 

[pause]

 

In summary, mobile apps are increasingly important these days. In a lot of cases, companies are creating the mobile version before the desktop version. And APEX can make creating mobile apps a lot easier than it would otherwise be. But it’s important to remember that mobile apps are not desktop apps, so if you’re experienced in one area and not the other, there will probably some learning that you need to do. But Mobile Patterns can help you. It can inspire you and just help solve common problems. So, just be ready to learn and open to change. 

 

[pause]

 

I’d like to take a moment here to just do a couple of plugs, tell you about some upcoming events. We have our intro, advanced, HTML, CSS, and Java script classes coming up. You can see the dates for those here. 

 

[pause]

 

Also, I want to give Dave just a moment to tell you about some of our services as well.

 

>> Dave:  Thanks, Dan. Thanks for a fantastic presentation. I really think a lot of people got a lot out of this. You know, folks, a lot of things that we do in addition to the training that we offer is we often do consulting and application development full life cycle. So if you want to get started faster than you think your training curve can take you or your staff’s training curve, we’re happy to come in and help and mentor you along the way. So, keep that in mind. We would love for you to give us a call and see how we can help you. 

 

[pause]

 

I think there’s one summary question or one takeaway I’d like to re-emphasize here, Dan. There is a question on the queue, how can we change our existing applications to mobile apps? I don’t think there’s a click. It’s not a click away. Would that be a fair statement? There is a learning curve involved.

 

>> Dan:  Very fair. Yeah. Even if there was some kind of generator, it wouldn’t get it right. I guess my point here is that APEX will make creating mobile apps easier for you, but it’s going to require some thought, it’s going to require you to put some attention and some time into actually doing it to get the end user experience as good as it could be.

 

[pause]

 

>> Dave:  That’s great. Let me throw one last question at you. 

 

[pause]

 

The mobile functionality is implemented via jQuery Mobile. Are there any extensions to the APEX Java script API for mobile elements?

 

[pause]

 

>> Dan:  Are there any extensions to the API for mobile elements? I’m not too sure where that question was going. But the jQuery Mobile library when it enhances elements to really get them working in the mobile world better, it does at the same time exposed to you the API. So if they provide, for example, a function then you do have access to it and you could perhaps utilize dynamic actions in APEX to work with those APIs.

 

>> Dave:  I think we need a little more clarification there. Well listen, Dan, unbelievable presentation as always. We will send you all for your attendees, we will send an e-mail out where you can review this tutorial as often as you wish and share it with your friends and we’ll put the link to download the app on that tutorial page. 

 

Thanks, everyone for attending. I appreciate it very much. Please contact us if you like to attend the class. You saw the list of class that are coming up or if we can help you get started with your APEX development a little faster than perhaps your learning curve would take you. 

 

So thanks again, everyone. Thank you, Dan, very much.

 

>> Dan:  Thanks, Dave. Thanks, everybody. Take care.

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